Podcast Feature: Meant to be Eaten

Kind thanks to the fab food studies podcast, “Meant to Be Eaten,” for having me on to talk about The Viking Immigrants and “Icelandic Cake Fight,” my recent article on the history of vínarterta in Gastronomica. Check out the interview here! Image: Vínarterta by Arden Jackson, photographed by Nelson Gerrard, Eyrarbakki Icelandic Heritage Centre  

Publications

Books The Viking Immigrants: Icelandic North Americans. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2020 Articles “Icelandic Cake Fight: History of an Immigrant Recipe.” Gastronomica: The Journal of Critical Food Studies 19, no. 4 (2019): 28-41. “‘Eskimo’ Immigrants and Colonial Soldiers: Icelandic Immigrants and the North-West Resistance, 1885.” Canadian Historical Review 99, no. 1 (2018): 63-97. (Winner of the 2019…

Vínarterta

One of the most common markers of modern Icelandic North American identity is a seven-layered torte called vínarterta (vee-nar-terta), also popularly (mis)spelled “vinatarta” or “vinaterta.” For this English speaking and seemingly assimilated ethnic group, vínarterta is a remarkably consistent and popular symbol of ethnic identity. This torte is regularly served during special occasions, particularly at Christmas,…

About

Dr. Laurie K. Bertram is a scholar specializing in histories of gender, sexuality and material culture in  the global North. Her forthcoming book, The Viking Immigrants: Icelandic North Americans (UTP)  uses everyday forms of expression, including baking, clothing and ghost stories, to understand the evolution of Icelandic immigrant popular culture and identity from 1870 onwards. Bertram’s…